berry-1238249_1920As a person growing up with all the twists and turns of the unexpected, the foundation was laid, behaviors formed and inconsistency the norm. Absolutely nothing I did was based on conforming to life or learning to “practice-practice-practice.”  However, I did understand the roller coaster ride of being obsessive when I wanted something. Although I made some headway with these habits, this mindset kept me in survival mode. Rebelling or turning a deaf ear was my normal reaction – silently my default. I didn’t realize how limited a view I had on life and that I was my own worst enemy. The statements that once fell on deaf ears, like “practice what you preach” and “practice makes perfect”, now makes sense to me.

One small change is the first step to other changes that follow.

As a Health Coach, I enjoy introducing simple suggestions to my clients, reassuring and motivating them until they see results and feel better. Having a new relationship with food helps to keep the mind open to endless possibilities for internal healing. Small changes in eating habits practiced daily will become a way of life and ultimately transforms us. Like anything new, it can feel more difficult than it really is. It just takes practice. You may be amazed at how good you can feel and the positive results which happen rather quickly.

Simple Ideas for small changes:

  • Keep a food diary: If there’s anything that will get you motivated to change your eating habits, it’s writing down everything you eat over a period of 3 days. You’ll be surprised at how much we eat unconsciously. This will help with setting goals for yourself.
  • Drink water: We so often underestimate the importance of staying hydrated. Water is an essential nutrient and drinking enough can completely change how you feel throughout the day. Start with 1.5 liters per day and increase over time.
  • Eat fruit: Fill a bowl with fresh fruits and leave on your table so they are visible. Having fruits around is a good practice and having them in view will entice you to eat them.
  • Keep it sweet: Raw brown sugar, instead of sweetener substitutes like, aspartame, acesulfame, and even Splenda, is always a better option. Remember you’re trying to detox your body from chemicals so adding others to your body doesn’t help. For a low glycemic response for those with blood sugar concerns, agave syrup and stevia are good options.
  • Ditch the soda: If you are a soda drinker look for new ideas that help you feel satisfied. You can try cutting back and try new things for substitutions that keep the palette happy. Green or white tea, topped with carbonated mineral water and adding fresh juices provide a really refreshing taste and add vitamins and minerals.

These are very basic, simple steps that can be taken but that can produce noticeable results. As we practice these acts of self-care it motivates us to go further and develop other new habits. All of these steps encourage us to move forward in our recovery and build our self-esteem. Practice these for two weeks and then incorporate more as you feel ready to progress.

Keep in mind that each day is a new beginning. All change begins with a desire for something better and taking the first step. Positive reinforcement and people of like mind can go a long way to keeping us moving into the steady flow of action. We can get excited about where our lives can go on every level. Even with limitations, your condition need not keep you stuck in old cycles. Feeding the body’s hunger with nutrient dense foods is your best line of defense not just on a physical level but all levels.

Please let me know if I can help to support your journey by going to my website for a Complimentary Assessment (details in my bio below). Working together and in small groups helps to be accountable.  We can learn a new freedom and new happiness.

Here’s to your health!

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