Blogs & Articles

Yoga

We can enter recovery early or late in life. We can start yoga when we are young or old. We can also combine the two early or late, in recovery or in age. The very important part of long term recovery and of long term asana (pose) yoga practice are similar- pay attention and adapt.

If you remember the famous Tina Turner song, you remember the refrain: “What’s love but a second hand emotion.” That is the way it used to be. I loved you if my needs, thrills, cravings, or wants were being met. I didn’t see YOU, I saw my desires. I was loving the “if…then” experience, not

What it used to be like, what happened and what it is like now is the traditional framework for sharing at a meeting. This progression holds true for both my recovery and my yoga practice. At one point my life was consumed by suffering which eventually became overwhelming. I had a life changing experience and

I treasure my recovery. I love the calm and finding moments of serenity in each day. In early recovery I used to think that a life without chaos would be boring. I was worried that without the ups and downs of crises and resolution, relationships that were no longer based on F&F (you know what

I quit drinking, That was hard; it was imperative, it was time, I had hit bottom. It was still hard. I quit taking drugs. Again, it was crucial; it was life saving, and it was hard. Working the steps: hard. Living life on life’s terms: hard. Learning to do things clean and sober for the

 Slowly my need for alcohol diminished. I was no longer afraid of facing my emotions. When my life hit that famous rock bottom in 2013, I didn’t go to a meeting or to treatment. I didn’t even accept that alcohol was playing a part in the disintegration of my ability to get through life’s troubles.

From time to time I teach an eight week class at the Recovery Cafe San Jose called “Befriending Your Body”. A simple seated yoga practice combined with breathing techniques and meditation after a check in make for a lively session with the students. Combining some recovery oriented discussion with mindful movements is a way for

Recovery is a program of action. We are encouraged to “participate in our own recovery”, to work the twelve steps until they work IN us. Being complete, being exhaustive in our efforts is highly recommended. In the big book of AA we are nearly promised a life free of relapse when we practice the principles

Considering Recovery? Talk to a Treatment Specialist:Considering Recovery? Talk to a Treatment Specialist:888-401-1241Response time about 1 min | Response rate 100%
Who Answers?